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"Precision Basher"
fyrstormer - 3.22.17, 11:27 am Post #21: | Reply With Quote
Yes, that's how I learned that aluminum on aluminum grinds together, deforms both piece of metal, and performs inconsistently because aluminum under pressure likes to stick to things -- especially to other pieces of aluminum. Aluminum on plastic performs much more consistently.
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"ae fanboy"
Kingy - 3.22.17, 5:50 pm Post #22: | Reply With Quote
If you say so. If I'm forced to use a servo saver, I want it to not be a weak point. Luckily the 3 I do use I can tighten enough that they are basically locked anyway.

I would have thought if it was such a big issue that racing manufacturers wouldn't use aluminium as a material for them.
Associated [RC10B5M - RC10T4.1 FT - RC10B4.1 WORLD'S - RC10B44.2 - RC8T CE-E - RC8BE]
Durango [DESC210R] Ofna [NEXX10SC] Serpent [S411] RC4WD [Bully - Bully2]
Gmade [Sawback] Axial [Scx10 - Wraith - Yeti] Eagle Racing [TT-01 V.3] MST [FXX-D]
fyrstormer's Avatar
"Precision Basher"
fyrstormer - 3.22.17, 8:09 pm Post #23: | Reply With Quote
Servo-savers are "weak points" by definition. They actuate to relieve the stress of sharp impacts. They just do it gracefully so they can spring back to their original position over and over.

Companies will make whatever people will buy. Case in point: RB Innovations Nitro Superchargers. Racers might not fall for that particular gimmick, but they still love voodoo, and stiffness is their favorite kind of voodoo. So there are any number of RC companies, even respectable ones, that make aluminum upgrades that serve no useful purpose. Since cam-style servo-savers are complex assemblies, certain parts can benefit from being made of metal, but other parts don't. The cam assembly in particular benefits from being made from dissimilar materials.

All the information I can find about the RC8T's servo saver suggests that the bellcrank parts are all plastic, and they pivot on aluminum posts. Plastic cams rubbing together will not have the same problems as aluminum cams rubbing together. However, if you have an all-aluminum one that I haven't been able to find, set it such that it can actually do its job instead of being "basically locked", run it for a few months, then take it apart and examine its condition. You'll almost certainly find the surfaces of the cams are scraped and gouged, and the actuation is rough and inconsistent.
(Last edited by fyrstormer : 3.22.17 at 8:15 pm)
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"Precision Basher"
fyrstormer - 3.28.17, 7:41 pm Post #24: | Reply With Quote
After fighting with the new slipper-clutch setup for a few days, trying to get it to stop slipping quite so much, I decided to try something -- instead of the RC10 slipper plates and spring, which were originally prescribed for use in the conversion, I decided to try the SC10 slipper plates and spring. They never gave me any trouble in my SC10B, and sure enough, they fit STRC's top shaft for the Slash transmission as well. The larger stiffer spring used on the SC10 slipper clutch makes it possible to get the slipper tight enough without fully-compressing the spring, so it remains finely adjustable like it ought to be.



Also, while I was digging around in the truck, I decided to install a cooling fan on the Dynamite brushed ESC I've been using, because powering that large 550-size motor in a (relatively) heavy short-course truck makes the passively-cooled ESC a little hotter than I'm comfortable with. Conveniently, the same 25mm fans I use to cool the endbells on my brushed motors also fit on the Dynamite ESC, with a couple 3mm screws driven into the gaps between the heatsink fins. They hold the fan nice and securely.

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"Vacationing user"
agusorgen - 3.29.17, 3:34 am Post #25: | Reply With Quote
Which brushed motor?
"New user"
JimmyStevens - 3.29.17, 10:35 am Post #26: | Reply With Quote
fyrstormer, are you using a label maker to label shock oil wt? It looks like it in your picture. Excelllent idea if so. If so do you find that the labels stay on pretty good?
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"Precision Basher"
fyrstormer - 3.29.17, 1:40 pm Post #27: | Reply With Quote
Holmes Hobbies TorqueMaster Pro 550, custom-built with an 11-turn armature. (Holmes Hobbies usually builds slow rock-crawler motors, but you can ask them to build any motor you want if you're willing to wait a few weeks.)
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"Vacationing user"
agusorgen - 3.29.17, 2:19 pm Post #28: | Reply With Quote
I never understood the turn thing, more turns are better or worse? I mean, the hi end brushed motors have lots of turns and the prices increase when turns increase. But in brushless motors, the ones with more turns are cheaper (which if logic serves me right, it is worse) and the less turns the more expensive, from what i've seen.

Why?
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"Precision Basher"
fyrstormer - 3.29.17, 3:28 pm Post #29: | Reply With Quote
Turns = the number of times the wire is wrapped around the armature. Fewer turns = less wire = lower electrical resistance = more wattage = higher speed and more torque. However, fewer turns also = more heat and more likelihood of burning out the motor if it has to move a heavy load for too long. That's why high-turn motors are used for rock crawling, because higher turns = more wire = higher electrical resistance = lower wattage = less heat, so they're less likely to burn-out when working hard to lift a heavy truck over steep rocks.

Brushless motors work the same way: fewer turns = less wire = lower electrical resistance = higher wattage = higher speed and more torque. However, brushless motors are usually rated by KV (RPMs per volt) instead, because brushless motors don't have any scrubbing parts to wear out, so their KV never changes. Brushed motors can be rated by KV, but it's only approximate, because the actual KV changes constantly as the brushes and commutator wear out, so instead they're rated by turns because that never changes.
(Last edited by fyrstormer : 3.29.17 at 3:31 pm)
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"Vacationing user"
agusorgen - 3.29.17, 3:50 pm Post #30: | Reply With Quote
So can it be that the stock 3300kv reedy associated includes has 0.00000000000000000000000000000001 turn? I mean it has less torque than a dead premature lizard? I mean i put a flipflop infront of my sc10b when it is just standing, i press the thrortle and it just coggs. Can it be that the esc is weak too?
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