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"Experienced user"
RCPetey - 1.07.13, 11:17 am Post #1: | Reply With Quote
This may seem like a dumb question to some of you, but what is the real world difference between a stock (TQi for instance) radio and an aftermarket higher end radio?
Is it better performance? Better control? Better signal?

I haven't owned an aftermarket radio and am wondering if it is worth getting one or two. Like one 2.4 and one crystal.

Thanks.
"Experienced user"
Shadow_S2K - 1.07.13, 4:08 pm Post #2: | Reply With Quote
First off, most higher end radios will have an screen, easier to navigate the menu and change setting and some have more then 10 ore more model memory. Build quality is also better, and more adjustability when it comes to throttle, steering, and expo.
indy34096's Avatar
"Shake n' Bake"
indy34096 - 1.07.13, 4:39 pm Post #3: | Reply With Quote
More adjustability!
Associated B4.1 FT, Associated RC10 Classic, ProBoat Impulse 26
He passed me, so I rammed him. -- Rocket Rex Staten
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iammiah's Avatar
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iammiah - 1.08.13, 6:03 am Post #4: | Reply With Quote
Generally, like indy and shadow have mentioned, there is a lot more stuff that you can adjust and tune to your preferences. Also, build quality and reliability is normally superior in high-end radios compared to cheap ones. One exception to this are FlySky radios. They have proven to be reliable and have a good deal of functions for the price. They do however need a little bit of modding in order for everything to work perfectly, while higher-end brands (eg. Futaba, Airtronics, Radiopost, JR, KO Propo) rarely have problems and also have much better product and customer support.
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BillDeLong's Avatar
"Did I make the A Main?"
BillDeLong - 1.08.13, 7:19 am Post #5: | Reply With Quote
in addition to what is already said, many high end radios also allow for ergonomics adjustments to relocate the steering wheel to unlimited different angles as well as completely flipping them over for left handed drivers.

They also offer throttle mixing which is necessary for motorcycles which controls how much additional brake is applied to the front wheel so the rear end doesn't slide out of control.

Finally, most high end radios also have reduced latency, something I can't really tell the difference between my FlySky FS-GT3B/C radios and my Radio Post TS-401, but racers with more experience than me swear it is night/day difference for them.

In the true realm of things, you will be better off upgrading to a high quality servo before upgrading the radio. Savox 1258 is a decent mid grade servo that most racers swear by, and then Radio Post makes some very high quality servos with high torque/speed and more importantly, precision.

If you are just a basher, then keep what you have, no need to upgrade anything until something breaks
Club Racer: SCT + eBuggy + GT8e + GT18e + USGT + VTA + M12
Basher:
Monster Trucks + Crawlers + Drifters + Motorcycles

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"Experienced user"
PetRock - 1.08.13, 6:13 pm Post #6: | Reply With Quote
BillDeLong said
Finally, most high end radios also have reduced latency, something I can't really tell the difference between my FlySky FS-GT3B/C radios and my Radio Post TS-401, but racers with more experience than me swear it is night/day difference for them.

In the true realm of things, you will be better off upgrading to a high quality servo before upgrading the radio. Savox 1258 is a decent mid grade servo that most racers swear by, and then Radio Post makes some very high quality servos with high torque/speed and more importantly, precision.

If you are just a basher, then keep what you have, no need to upgrade anything until something breaks
Bill: You've driven so many models I was surprised you still use a FS-GT3B, especially with Radio Post as an option. Is the reason mostly financial: you couldn't afford to put receivers in all your cars if they weren't $7 each?

I have a couple FS-GT3B's and am happy with them, but noticed an immediate difference when I put a Savox 1257TG in my 2wd buggy. I can't help but wonder if I'd get a similar improvement if I switched to a midrange radio like an Airtronics MT-4, or Futaba 4PL. I don't really want to spend $200-$400 and just roll the dice.

You've got enough cars that have seen a track: have you tried any reduced-latency radio that you thought was better? (even if they have $100 RX's?).
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"Did I make the A Main?"
BillDeLong - 1.08.13, 6:24 pm Post #7: | Reply With Quote
I am getting ready to do some video reviews comparing servos side by side as well as the RadioPost with the GT3B and GT3C so folks can see for themselves what the latency looks like. Cutting to the chase, a modified GT3x radio is the best value and perfectly fine for club level racing. The reasons necessary to go mid/high end is if you need a leftie setup or throttle mixing.

If you decide to upgrade for whatever reason, it seems that folks with Spektrum radios have had more problems than any other brand that I have seen in the tracks in my area. RadioPost (both radios and servos) is the probably the top choice among the faster drivers. These are the guys who usually place at the state level for both on-road and off-road comps.

Yes, I will continue to keep using my FS radios, and honestly, the main reason I still have the TS-401 is because of my motorcycle. Perhaps as I become a better driver, I might appreciate the TS-401 more, but for now I just don't see the cost benefit adding up for the price of it
Club Racer: SCT + eBuggy + GT8e + GT18e + USGT + VTA + M12
Basher:
Monster Trucks + Crawlers + Drifters + Motorcycles

JayhawkNavy02's Avatar
"Experienced user"
JayhawkNavy02 - 1.09.13, 12:15 pm Post #8: | Reply With Quote
BillDeLong said
In the true realm of things, you will be better off upgrading to a high quality servo before upgrading the radio. Savox 1258 is a decent mid grade servo that most racers swear by, and then Radio Post makes some very high quality servos with high torque/speed and more importantly, precision.
Bill is right on.

I bought a very expensive servo, which I used with my Spektrum DX3E, which is a decent radio, along with a SR300 DSM1 receiver, which isn't so great. Anyway, I immediately felt connected to the car; however, my SR300 would continually suffer brown outs and the range was shorter than others, which could be an issue at larger outdoor tracks and bashing. I bought a CC BEC, this fixed the majority of issues, but when a lot of DSM1 or cheaper transmitters were around, I would still have issues, one of which caused a pretty sever crash (at least I like to think so I could have bought a DSM2 receiver for $100, but I decided to switch companies before I invested too much.

I now have a good Futaba radio and haven't had a problem since. A good servo, receiver and transmitter are the triad for happy driving and can't really be separated. It doesn't mean you have to have the latest greatest, but you want something that isn't going to hamper the other items performance.

One thing I do find funny, what good is it to obsess over latency measured in miliseconds if you go out and buy a servo slower than other options by several hundredths of a second. A decent transmitter/reciever from any company is going to outperform the fastest servo made. I understand ergonomics, channels, mixing, etc. I am just trying to advocate a balance. Get a great servo and a good radio/receiver, like a 4PL, MT-4, or any other reputable name brand etc. and get racing!

If you can afford the best, well....buy it
(Last edited by JayhawkNavy02 : 1.09.13 at 1:34 pm)
Team Associated RC8.2e, Losi TEN-SCTE, Pro-Line Pro-2 2WD SCT, Axial SCX10 Dingo, Traxxas Slash 4x4 VXL, Traxxas Stampede 4x4 VXL Truggy, Traxxas Mini-Summit VXL 4x4
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"Because Racecar"
thestug - 1.11.13, 2:21 pm Post #9: | Reply With Quote
BillDeLong said
I am getting ready to do some video reviews comparing servos side by side as well as the RadioPost with the GT3B and GT3C so folks can see for themselves what the latency looks like. Cutting to the chase, a modified GT3x radio is the best value and perfectly fine for club level racing. The reasons necessary to go mid/high end is if you need a leftie setup or throttle mixing.

If you decide to upgrade for whatever reason, it seems that folks with Spektrum radios have had more problems than any other brand that I have seen in the tracks in my area. RadioPost (both radios and servos) is the probably the top choice among the faster drivers. These are the guys who usually place at the state level for both on-road and off-road comps.

Yes, I will continue to keep using my FS radios, and honestly, the main reason I still have the TS-401 is because of my motorcycle. Perhaps as I become a better driver, I might appreciate the TS-401 more, but for now I just don't see the cost benefit adding up for the price of it
Bill, what is your youtube channel name. I'm looking forward to any videos you may have. Mine is thestug93, you may add me if you wish.
Some say that he urinates 98 octane gasoline and that he sees everything in binary...

No one likes saggy voltage. No one.
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"Experienced user"
PetRock - 1.11.13, 2:25 pm Post #10: | Reply With Quote
I'm going to go out on a limb and guess, billdelong?
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