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2genewb's Avatar
"Impervious to Perfection"
2genewb - 2.19.13, 1:14 pm Post #1: | Reply With Quote
this how to is going to cover modding a hewlett packard DPS 600PB server power supply to be used as a power supply for your high current lipo chargers that demand up to and a bit over 500 watts. mods will include a power switch, powering on the supply and regulating the fan so it doesn't sound like a leer jet in your hobby cave unless there's a necessity for it.

when you first get your power supply you're going to want to remove all the philips flat head screws...



locate the red knob used for releasing the power supply out of the server...



you'll use that to pry up and remove the side panel...



you can drill out the two holes to release it...



or pry it off to release it since you no longer need the unit to lock into a server...



you'll never see the scratches, but that knob will be out of your way...



now to address the insulating sheet behind it...



it will have to be pried off the top panel so the panel can be pushed forward to unlock...



then you can lift that panel away from the pesky glue, slide it forward and it lifts right up...



feel free to mark a line at the bottom of the fan for height centering. you'll be drilling in there later for your switch...



there is some serious components inside there, so don't go poking around unless you know what you're doing...



remove the fan from the housing for easy access...



find your center spot, mark it and prepare it for drilling...



a little dab will do you...



it's only to keep the metal cool while drilling...



doesn't have to look pretty, but ideally you want to knock the burs down with a file once the hole's drilled...



you're going to need 3 servo plugs. if they're futaba style with the flange so you can't plug them in backwards, you'll want to cut that off...



now you're going to start on your harness to connect your pins on the power supply.

you'll want pin 4 (fan regulation pin - green) constantly connected to pin 8 (ground - red) so the fan isn't leer jet loud when you first plug the power supply in. the fan is going to power up immediately anyway, so you don't want it unregulated when the power supply is off.

you'll also want pins 6 and 10 (ps-on and ps-off - blue) together so they can easily be soldered onto your other terminal of your switch. when they're connected to ground, the power supply turns on and supplies voltage to the terminals...



then untwist the wire...



pry under the tabs on your servo connectors and pull the wire to remove the wire on unneeded pins...



you'll need 3 total. in this case, i wanted my tabs down so the metal in the connectors is exposed downward, while the bottom connector will be upside down to tuck that exposed metal in. for that you'll need 1 connector with the negative and signal wires for the top, 1 with the positive wire for the middle and 1 with the signal wire turned upside down for the very bottom row...



a dab of ca glue between each holds them together very well and very instantly. you might want to line them up against a flat surface to ensure they're lined up the first time. a second chance is rare here it seems...



and the final configuration. notice the bottom connector with only the signal wire is reversed.

note: if you just want it to turn on when you plug it in or just want a hot swappable plug that you can switch to a new unit if yours dies, you can just trim these wires short and solder them together. then you can just unplug it from one dps 600pb to the next and you have a new working power supply. it'll just need connection leads soldered on to the terminals. you could completely skip opening the case altogether if you wanted to...



the bottom connector will plug into the bottom row of pins leaving the top row exposed as they won't be used in this configuration. notice the black (fan regulation) wire and red (ground) wire are twisted together as they represent one side of our switch. as well the white (ps-on and ps-off) wires are twisted together for the other side.

feed them through the hole as pictured so they can be mocked up to be cut to size...



then feed them through the case hole you made leaving just a wee bit extra and cut them to be wired up...



strip and twist...



you'll need to pre-tin a spst (single pole, single throw [it just means on/off across one circuit]) mini toggle switch...



pre-tin your wires...



slide your 3mm shrink tube over...



attach the switch to the wires and shrink the tube over the connections...



too worried about getting the picture - DOH!



then slide your switch in from behind and place your nut and lock washer to secure it in place...



re-attach your fan and place your top panel back on...



put your side panel in position and re-install your philips flat head screws...



a look at the front including the harness...



shrink tube and install the harness. then power the bad boy up and check to see if it's working properly...

power on...



power off...



green LED in the back shines when the power is turned on also...



to get a clean look and some electrical insurance, i like to shrink tube mine with 100mm shrink tube... but i don't want anybody's name printed on it until i put one on there. so a little lacquer thinner and a rag goes a long way.

before...



after...



then just slip it over and line one seam to the bottom corner...



then it's time for the heat gun. you want to slowly, evenly, carefully shrink the whole thing most of the way, flip it, shrink the bottom, then flip and shrink as necessary until everything's nice and tight...



cooling along the way is a great idea. don't want your electronics getting too hot.



trim your excess. make sure to leave plenty of room for air flow...



next, as a one off you'll do a little alcohol prep for any labels...







then you'll need about 4 or 5 inches of 10 AWG wire for your terminal leads in both black and red...





strip maybe ~3/4" off the end of each wire...



fold the wire as close to even down the middle as you can...



fold the wire up just outside the sheathing and hold it in place with something. i used what used to be good hemostats from my crazy uncle who's a cadaver make up artist for a funeral home. use what you got that fits the bill...



shape the tip into a spade while tinning it...



the spade...



cut the spade to the depth of the spades on the power supply, maybe a couple mills shorter..



finished...



this is all so you can use both spades on either end of the power supply like so. so plug them in...



put your iron between the spade and the wire and try to feed solder in from the deepest part of the connection for a good bond...



cool the terminals when done as a safety precaution. also tape your harness out of the way before soldering the inside terminals or the positive terminals...



slip 10mm shrink tube over the terminals...



shrink it up and strip 4-6mm of sheathing off the end of your leads to accept bullets...



the wire won't be a perfectly compacted circle most likely, so you'll have to smooth it down as thin as you can get it to make it fit in a 4mm female bullet so it's compatible with most chargers...



then tin it...



pre-tin your bullet and solder them together...



repeat with the other wire and apply 6mm shrink tube...



plug your harness back in (in this case, i left the print on to mark the harness bottom)...



test your work...





for chargers that require 24V to get full output potential you'll need a second power supply in series.

however, this second power supply will have to have the DC ground disconnected so as to not short the power supplies and potentially have the case of the power supply outputting the voltage from your wall socket. overlooking this can be very dangerous to not only your equipment, but to you as well. once you disconnect your ground on your second power supply it can only be used as your 24V side of your power supply and cannot be used by itself or to provide 12V in any way, shape or form. your first (still grounded) power supply will be good for all your 12V needs.

the red arrows point to what you have to address. the ground must be broken at these points. the screw at the top of the board can be electrically isolated from the board with an isolating grommet or can be completely removed. if you remove it you'll want to fasten some plastic or rubber behind it to keep the stand off from touching the board there.

the other red arrow points to two jumpers. they have to be removed from the board or cut so they cannot make connection again.

you'll want to confirm continuity has been severed between the board and these points before powering up and jumpering your power supplies for 24V. failure to do so could result in a short that leaves the cases of the two power supplies providing live A/C voltage from your wall socket. this means if the two touch or make connection between any conductive material (like a human body) the same thing would happen as would if you connected a wall socket straight to that object (like grabbing bare wires from an exposed wall socket). when you disconnect that ground, the power supply has to be connected to the positive of the grounded power supply so they can share a common ground.

circled in green below is your negative lead side of the power supply. once you've removed the ground, this is the side you'll jumper to your grounded power supply. (negative of the modified power supply to positive of your still grounded 12V power supply)

locations of the screw (top red arrow), the jumpers (red arrow - both wires need to be disconnected) and the ground leads (that need to be connected to the positive leads of the grounded supply)...



a closer look at the jumpers. a little blurry, but you get the idea...



xandrios of RCGroups said
Whitedg, the DPS-600pb also has these pins.
Use a 1k ohm pot between pins 3 and 9(+12 return sense) to increase voltage above 12v.
Use a 1k ohm pot between pins 5 and 9 to decrease voltage below 12v.
Or use a single 2k-10k pot with the outer legs tied to pins 3 and 5 and the center wiper to pin 9 for voltage adjustment above and below 12v.
I've modified a pic by mrforsyth to show how to do this.
Voltage is adjustable up to 13.8v on this supply. OVP starts at 13.82v.
If the PS shuts down at 13.8v with a load then just back down to a voltage that works for your particular situation.
Short pin 4 to ground to slow fan speed to a minimum or use pot for variable speed.
Once pin 4 is grounded, fan speed will be automatically adjusted based on load and ambient temperature.
Pin 4 is already internally connected to ground on the PS-3601-1C version of the ESP135 series.
Therefore, connect it to +12v to set fan speed to maximum.
Pin 11 is the +12v current share pin.
Short pins 6,8 and 10 together to power up.


265Ω = 13.8v
290Ω = 13.7v
330Ω = 13.6v
370Ω = 13.5v

source... http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showp...&postcount=586

you can parallel outputs to double your current if necessary. you'll have to connect pin 11 on each pair of voltage matching power supplies so they share the load. so say, you wanted 12V @ 1150 watts you'd just jumper pin 11 on 2 12V power supplies with their ground still in tact and connect positive to positive and negative to negative on the outputs.

if you wanted 24V you'd need to mod 2 sets of series connected power supplies and connect pin 11 of the 12V on one set to pin 11 of the 12V on the other set and pin 11 of the 24V supply to pin 11 of the remaining 24V supply.

see pinout here... http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showp...&postcount=702
(Last edited by 2genewb : 2.24.13 at 1:24 am)
No Cerveza, No Trabajo. Muchas Gracias.
ntp's Avatar
"Surprisingly Informative"
ntp - 2.19.13, 5:19 pm Post #2: | Reply With Quote
Epic!
And guess what uncle gene?

I missed the freakin' mailman with my fruit salad from china!!

Imagine my soul crushing disappointment.

Nice "How to"

Axial AX-10 Scorpion Modified a tad.
Summit vxl the "Tink Tank"
Stampede 4x4 vxl.
Cadillac RC10 GoldTub minor mods.
Slash 2wd
2genewb's Avatar
"Impervious to Perfection"
2genewb - 2.19.13, 8:31 pm Post #3: | Reply With Quote
sorry to hear, nathan terrence. you'll get it next time.

thanks big guy. much appreciated.
No Cerveza, No Trabajo. Muchas Gracias.
St3alth_Frenzy's Avatar
"Experienced user"
St3alth_Frenzy - 2.19.13, 8:34 pm Post #4: | Reply With Quote
good walk-though, just a suggestion. You should make the images a bit smaller because they use to much ram on my iphone, safari crashes...
ℐ αμ ◎✞ ḺαẐ⑂⑂ 2ℛѦ∃Ḏ ∂їṧḯ﹩
ntp's Avatar
"Surprisingly Informative"
ntp - 2.20.13, 3:46 am Post #5: | Reply With Quote
St3alth_Frenzy said
good walk-though, just a suggestion. You should make the images a bit smaller because they use to much ram on my iphone, safari crashes...

^no.
This is not the dark age of the internet. ...get a real phone.

Axial AX-10 Scorpion Modified a tad.
Summit vxl the "Tink Tank"
Stampede 4x4 vxl.
Cadillac RC10 GoldTub minor mods.
Slash 2wd
GeekMAXX's Avatar
"Experienced user"
GeekMAXX - 2.20.13, 9:36 am Post #6: | Reply With Quote
So i've heard of this done before and I just want to make sure I understand why....so you're using the power supply (rechargeable battery?) from an uninterrupted power supply for a pc....to power your lipo charger via dc....so you dont have to use your car battery?
(Last edited by GeekMAXX : 2.20.13 at 9:39 am)
Losi SCTE- Tekin Pro4 HD 4300kv, Hobbywing SCT-pro, 2s LiPo.
Axial SCX-10 Dingo-Holmes Hobbies Expert 35t, Holmes Hobbies BR-XL esc, 3s LiPo
Tacon Soar 1/14 buggy on 2s LiPo
Mugen MBX6e- Tekin T8 1900kv gen 2, Tekin Rx8 Gen2 esc, 2x 2s LiPo
2genewb's Avatar
"Impervious to Perfection"
2genewb - 2.20.13, 2:03 pm Post #7: | Reply With Quote
St3alth_Frenzy said
good walk-though, just a suggestion. You should make the images a bit smaller because they use to much ram on my iphone, safari crashes...
i'll give it some thought. dunno, though. i deleted all the originals from my PC so i might have to download them all, resize them one by one, upload them then spend the time to locate where each one goes one at a time to repost them where they belong. it could easily be half a days work or more.

GeekMAXX said
So i've heard of this done before and I just want to make sure I understand why....so you're using the power supply (rechargeable battery?) from an uninterrupted power supply for a pc....to power your lipo charger via dc....so you dont have to use your car battery?
no

i'm using A/C voltage to power the power supply that supplies D/C voltage to my high powered charger. the power supply plugs right into the wall with a pc power cord like this...



power supplies that can power a 500 - 1000+ watt charger aren't cheap off the shelf. this power supply gives steadier voltage, has better protection circuitry and costs ~$15 before mods. better product - lower price. just needs some DIY handiness.
No Cerveza, No Trabajo. Muchas Gracias.
GeekMAXX's Avatar
"Experienced user"
GeekMAXX - 2.21.13, 6:52 pm Post #8: | Reply With Quote
Okay, so its only useful if you have a dc only charger? Essentially it lets you use your DC charger off of an AC outlet?
Losi SCTE- Tekin Pro4 HD 4300kv, Hobbywing SCT-pro, 2s LiPo.
Axial SCX-10 Dingo-Holmes Hobbies Expert 35t, Holmes Hobbies BR-XL esc, 3s LiPo
Tacon Soar 1/14 buggy on 2s LiPo
Mugen MBX6e- Tekin T8 1900kv gen 2, Tekin Rx8 Gen2 esc, 2x 2s LiPo
ntp's Avatar
"Surprisingly Informative"
ntp - 2.22.13, 5:42 am Post #9: | Reply With Quote
GeekMAXX said
#1Okay, so its only useful if you have a dc only charger? #2 Essentially it lets you use your DC charger off of an AC outlet?
#1 No. it could be used to power any device that needs 12v +/- . You could weld with it to a certain degree. ...very small scale welding, like on your bench with your r/c projects. You could make your own soldering Iron. I could sit and think of probably a dozen more. ...some may be pretty out there, but I bet I could.

#2 Yes.
Axial AX-10 Scorpion Modified a tad.
Summit vxl the "Tink Tank"
Stampede 4x4 vxl.
Cadillac RC10 GoldTub minor mods.
Slash 2wd
GeekMAXX's Avatar
"Experienced user"
GeekMAXX - 2.22.13, 9:18 pm Post #10: | Reply With Quote
Cool, thanks for the clarification
Losi SCTE- Tekin Pro4 HD 4300kv, Hobbywing SCT-pro, 2s LiPo.
Axial SCX-10 Dingo-Holmes Hobbies Expert 35t, Holmes Hobbies BR-XL esc, 3s LiPo
Tacon Soar 1/14 buggy on 2s LiPo
Mugen MBX6e- Tekin T8 1900kv gen 2, Tekin Rx8 Gen2 esc, 2x 2s LiPo
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